The new Revised & Expanded Edition of Wheat Belly released!

The complete updated Wheat Belly program is now available in the Revised & Expanded Edition of Wheat Belly! (For availability, see below.)

In the original Wheat Belly, I recounted how agribusiness and geneticists altered traditional strains of wheat, yielding the high-yield semi-dwarf strain that now dominates supermarket shelves. Consuming modern foods made from this plant yields peculiar, sometimes crippling, health effects, while dramatic benefits develop upon removing it from the diet. If you’ve been following the Wheat Belly conversations, you are no stranger to the huge successes people have shared on this lifestyle.

But lessons have been learned along the way in the marvelous worldwide grain-eliminating experience, lessons shared in subsequent books: Wheat Belly Total Health, Wheat Belly 10-Day Grain Detox, the Wheat Belly cookbooks. The list of strategies we use has grown, strategies that have helped many more people lose the weight they want to lose, address residual health problems, address deficiencies caused by grain consumption but persist after their removal, go further in efforts such as cultivating a healthy microbiome.

So I have rewritten the original Wheat Belly, added the complete prescriptive program we now follow, expanded on discussions about hormonal health and efforts to cultivate a healthy microbiome, tweaked details of the diet, and added new recipes. Anyone who read the original Wheat Belly will recognize a lot that’s familiar, but you will also find plenty that is new. This means that the entire Wheat Belly program is now available in this single Revised & Expanded edition.

Wheat Belly has therefore been completely updated with new material that includes:

  • The FULL Wheat Belly program that we now all follow
  • New and delicious recipes to suit your Wheat Belly lifestyle
  • New discussions on topics such as hormonal health and cultivation of a healthy microbiome

Wheat Belly was the original book that turned the nutritional world topsy-turvy and exposed “healthy whole grains” as the genetically altered Frankenwheat imposed on the public by agricultural geneticists and agribusiness. The tidal wave of astounding health and weight loss successes has created a nationwide movement away from the destructive effects of wheat products. The Revised & Expanded edition now takes you to the next level for health, weight loss, and freedom from numerous diseases and prescription drugs.

  • Removing products made with modern wheat yields astounding and often unexpected benefits in health and weight loss.
  • Autoimmune, gastrointestinal, and mind effects top the list for conditions that improve or reverse with wheat elimination.
  • Weight loss can occur at a surprising rate, typically 15-18 pounds over the first month, when wheat is eliminated.

The new Wheat Belly Revised & Expanded editions is available for pre-order for release on Tuesday Dec 10 from:

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

Books-A-Million

Indiebound

“Wheat Belly hit like a bomb”: Author Dana Carpender reviews the Revised & Expanded Edition of Wheat Belly

Dana Carpender, friend and author of many low-carb cookbooks, provided this review of my new Revised & Expanded Wheat Belly, below.

For more of Dana’s signature wit and conversation, you can join her on her engaging Facebook page “Hold the toast press” or visit her Amazon page that lists all her wonderful low-carb cookbooks.

It’s funny how things happen. Nine years ago I had already been eating a low carbohydrate diet for 16 years. During that time I had occasionally eaten low carb tortillas and low carb bread. These things were hardly a staple of my diet, but I kept ’em around for the occasional late-night grilled cheese sandwich or whatever. But the longer I ate low carb, the less I cared about them and the less often I ate them. Which is why, by January of 2011, it had been at least 8 months since I’d bothered eating either low carb bread or tortillas.

I was working on slow cooker recipes and came up with a recipe for slow cooker mu shu pork. As you may or may not know, mu shu dishes are served wrapped in Chinese pancakes. I figured low carb tortillas would be a fine substitute. So I made a supper of it, having two low carb tortillas wrapped around my meat and vegetables.

I woke up feeling like grim death. Bleary, thick-headed, exhausted, achy all over. It felt like a combination of a bad hangover and going hypothyroid. It was two days before I was back to my usual cheerful, energetic self.

Serendipitously, within a week or two I received a review copy of Dr. William Davis’s Wheat Belly in the mail. 

As I wrote in my original review of the book, I have read a lot of books since I first became interested in nutrition in the summer of ’78. I generally learn a little something new from each one. But Wheat Belly? Wheat Belly hit like a bomb. Every page brought information I simply had not known, had not even suspected.  I knew about celiac disease, but wheat linked to schizophrenia? Seizures? Dementia? Cancer? And a more, in a long and scary list? I had had no idea.

Completely new to me, too, was the information regarding the extreme hybridization of wheat — not the genetic modification that’s the current nutritional boogeyman, just crossing various strains of wheat, to the point that modern wheat is genetically a completely different plant than our grandparents ate — and one that has never been proven safe for human consumption. (Please note: even ancient grains were not good for humanity. The adoption of agriculture resulted in a drop in stature — humans are just recently beginning to reach the height of their hunter-gatherer ancestors — the weakening of bones, and the narrowing of the pelvic outlet, making childbearing far more dangerous and painful than it had hitherto been.)

Add to that the news that wheat is physically addictive — like, really, truly, similar-to-opioids addictive. And you wondered why you have cravings? 

So I’ve been gluten-free ever since. Oh, I may get a tiny bit now and then by mistake, but then, I don’t have celiac. I’m not one of the people who is going to become desperately ill from a single crumb. But eat anything made with gluten grains deliberately? Nope.

It’s not just gluten, as Wheat Belly makes clear. Amylopectin A found in wheat (and other grains, like corn) turns out to be a super-carb, jacking blood sugar up worse than table sugar or corn syrup. Phytates bind up minerals, so those “healthy whole grains” actually lead to deficiencies.

Gluten itself can be broken down into gliadin which, among other charming tendencies, attacks the intestinal wall, causing everything from irritable bowel to leaky gut, and eventually autoimmune disease. Another gut-ripper is wheat germ agglutinin — which agricultural science has deliberately increased in the name of pest control. And you were worried about pesticides on your food! (As a long-time nutrition buff, I remember when wheat germ was the wonder-food du jour. Brrr.)

And exorphins! You know about endorphins, of course — the happy-juice your brain creates in reaction to exercise and such. Exorphins are just what they sound like — drug-like compounds from outside the body. Yes, wheat can get you high and is physically addictive.

In short, everything made of wheat, from an Oreo cookie to 100% whole grain bread, contains as pretty a package of poisons as you’re likely to find posing as food.

Which leads me to one more issue: Since Wheat Belly was first published in 2011, many, many people have chosen to quit eating gluten. Many other people have, for reasons that pass understanding, decided to be honked off about this. “I don’t mind people with celiac asking for gluten-free stuff. But those people who just pretend to be gluten-sensitive are muddying the waters! How can we know if it’s really important that their food is gluten-free? Why do they have to jump on the bandwagon?”

Why do you freaking care?! Do you question why Jewish folks don’t want their eggs scrambled in bacon grease? 

My experience with the tortillas tells me that my body does not like wheat. Isn’t that enough? Can I eschew gluten grains (and grains in general) not because I have celiac but because I’m convinced they are not wholesome food for humans?

I should add that despite the deluge of important and often disturbing information, Wheat Belly is far from a grim read. Bill Davis is a fine writer; he makes the science easy to comprehend, even entertaining — and often funny.

If you’ve wondered what the whole shift away from gluten is about, you need to read Wheat Belly. If someone close to you has gone gluten-free and you cannot understand why you need to read Wheat Belly. If you have been toying with going gluten-free because a lot of your health-conscious friends have gone gluten-free, you need to read Wheat Belly. If you have, indeed, gone gluten-free because you’ve heard various information going around, but would like to bring the reasons into laser-sharp focus, you need to read Wheat Belly. If you’re tired of family and/or friends giving you grief over eschewing wheat and want sound, scientific information to argue with you need to read Wheat Belly. And if like me, you’re just a big health-and-nutrition geek, you have really, really got to read Wheat Belly.

For those of you who read the first edition, there is new info to be had; science marches on. I was pleased to learn of new tests for various wheat sensitivities, all of them less alarming than a bowel biopsy via endoscope. That said, I don’t need a test, I’m convinced.

Because of the new tests, they’ve found a whole lot of people have markers for celiac without the classic symptoms — but increased rates of all kinds of other ugly health consequences. I emailed Dr. Davis partway through reading the new edition of Wheat Belly with the inelegant subject line “Holy s***, Bill.” I had read a few reports recently of alarmingly increased rates of death among younger Americans starting in their 20s. The opioid epidemic is implicated but does not account for all of it. Then I read that celiacs have 29% increased mortality — and that celiac has nearly doubled in the past several decades. (Wait until you read how they discovered that!)

Dr. Davis started a movement 9 years ago, one that has improved the health of thousands. Wheat Belly was important then; it is only more so now. Read it.

The new Wheat Belly Revised & Expanded edition is available from:

Amazon Barnes & Noble

Books-A-Million

Indiebound

Barnes & Noble

An excerpt from the Revised & Expanded Edition of Wheat Belly

 

The original Wheat Belly book rocked the nutritional world with its revolutionary ideas. But, as time has passed, I’ve added new strategies and concepts that have expanded the overall program and taken the health, weight, and youth-preserving benefits even further. I have therefore collected all this new material into a new Revised & Expanded Edition. The new Revised & Expanded Edition of Wheat Belly is now available at all major bookstores.

Here is a brief excerpt from the new foreword:

Wheat Belly began as my modest effort to help people with heart disease stop relying on the revolving door of angioplasty, stents, and bypass surgery. The lifestyle that evolved from this effort did indeed bring a halt to chest pain and heart attacks, converting my procedural practice into one that was purely preventive with virtually no need for heart procedures or hospitals. But it proved to accomplish far more than that. Drugs to reduce blood sugar or blood pressure? Gone. Drugs for acid reflux or diarrhea? Flushed down the toilet. Statin drugs with all-expenses-paid trips to Orlando for the prescriber? Phooey. These efforts evolved into a comprehensive program that addressed a long list of common modern health conditions, from excess weight to type 2 diabetes, from autoimmune conditions to irritable bowel syndrome, along with hundreds of others. The explosive success of this approach, not just in the reduction of heart disease, but in improvements in so many other areas of health, means that the world of nutrition and health will never be the same.

This new and expanded edition of Wheat Belly contains the latest version of this lifestyle, so readers can follow the strategies within as a stand-alone program. I detail the nutritional supplement program that compensates for nutrients deficient in former grain-eaters, as well as nutrients to compensate for deficiencies arising from living modern life. I introduce an in-depth discussion of the hormonal disruptions introduced by consuming “healthy whole grains” that I call Mr. and Mrs. Wheat Belly, showing how readers can take back personal control over hormonal health. I’ve updated the advice and added new recipes to incorporate all the lessons learned along the way as this lifestyle has been adopted by millions of people, making the message even more powerful and effective.

This book includes material never before published in any of the books in the Wheat Belly series. After all, we are trying to unlearn the many lessons drilled into us, now realizing it was all wrong, learning new lessons along the way. And, you know what? It is liberating, exhilarating, and enormously empowering. The problem all along was not you.

 

The new Wheat Belly Revised & Expanded edition is available from:

Amazon Barnes & Noble

Books-A-Million

Indiebound

Barnes & Noble

Myglamm K Play Flavoured Lipstick Orange Spin & Blueberry Rush Review

My today’s review will be about Myglamm K Play Flavoured Lipstick Orange Spin & Blueberry Rush. The new K.Play range by Myglamm comes with the motto of ‘krushing on flavour’. Myglamm K.Play Flavoured Lipstick Orange Spin & Blueberry Rush Review

These creamy matte lipsticks have unique flavours inspired by different fruits. Here’s what I found about these demi-matte and flavourful lipcolours.

About Myglamm K.Play Flavoured Lipstick Orange Spin & Blueberry Rush

The K.Play Flavoured Lipsticks by MyGlamm come in fun fruity flavours, tempting enough for you to cheat on your diet. Creamy shine finish and enriched with Vitamin E, these lip colours glide on streak-free in one swipe. All you need to do is pout pretty!

Features:

1. Crème touch finish

2. Intense colour pay off

3. Smooth application

4. Enriched with Vitamin E

5. Available in fresh fruity flavours

6. High coverage

7. Cruelty-free

Myglamm K.Play Flavoured Lipstick Orange Spin & Blueberry Rush Review

Packaging: These lipsticks comes in a round shaped matte pastel lavender coloured bullet. The cardboard outer packaging was quite beautiful with fruit grafiti. The brand mentions complete ingredient list in the outer packaging which I find quite important. The packaging is sturdy and travel-friendly.

Shade: The shade Orange Spin is a bright reddish orange. It is not a true coral orange; it is more on the red side on my lips. The shade looks more orange on deeper skin tones. This shade has warm undertones so this would look beautiful on most Indian complexions.

The shade Blueberry Rush is a blue based violet. The shade is quite deep and extremely bold. The shade looks more on the plum-violet side on lighter skin while the violet part comes out more on pigmented lips. This is definitely not a shade for the faint-hearted!

Texture, Pigmentation & Staying Power: Pigmentation of Myglamm K Play Flavoured Lipsticks is awesome for this lipstick range. I get opaque finish in one stoke. The shade does not look patchy. The texture is smooth and the finish is creamy matte. It stays on for 5-6 hours without meal. It leaves a light tint on the lips when the colour fades.

Fragrance: Each and every product from Myglamm’s K.Play range has unique fruity fragrance. The Orange Spin shade has tangy orange flavour. The Blueberry Rush shade has blue berry candy flavour. The fragrance is not very strong or longlasting so it won’t feel bothersome.

Quantity & Price: These lipsticks are priced at Rs.545 for 4.3gm of product. For a creamy matte lipstick the price seems a bit higher than the same quality products from other brands. It’s a good deal if you can get it on discount.

My Overall Thoughts:

I love orange lipsticks. Though the orange based shades are often quite bold and not daily wear lip colours but I still love the bright finish. Naturally, the Orange Spin shade has been able to win my heart. This is not a true orange; but a red based one. The red part makes it a wearable shade.

I sometimes use it as a tint or blush. This one works fine as blush due to its creamy formula. The shade Blueberry Rush, on the other side, has blue violet tone which does not complement my skin tone that well.

Plus, I am not that comfortable with such bluish lip colours so I can use it only as a tint. It gives a light plum kind of finish if used as  tint. Both Myglamm K Play Flavoured Lipsticks transfer but they can be blotted off with tissue for a more matte and transfer-proof finish.

Rating: 4.5/5 (for Orange Spin) & 2.5/5 (for Blueberry Rush)

Huda Beauty Matte & Metal Melted Shadows

[sample/affiliate] I’m going to sound like the Grinch, I know, but it’s so inconvenient having New Year in the middle of the week just when I’m getting back into the flow of things and really wanting to be here instead of making  merry all over again! However, there’s just time to squeeze in these Matte & Metal shadows from Huda Beauty which, when I first saw, loved, then on reflection didn’t like at all and now I’m somewhere in between.

Huda Beauty Matte & Metal Melted Shadows

On one side, you get a pastel matte shade that’s intense and almost veers into stage make up territory because it’s so pigmented. And weird shades. On the other side, you get a liquid shimmer top coat that you could wear alone or over the top of the matte. It’s a strong look!

Huda Beauty Matte & Metal Melted Shadows

I guess that you could create a mix of the two and apply that. The thing I’m not sure about is the applicators – they’re not accurate enough and personally, I would need to apply with a brush in order to get the precision required for such a dramatic look – one wobble in the wrong direction and you have to start over. Less so with the brush for the shimmer end – which by the way is VERY shimmery; I’m just about to step out to yoga knowing I’ve got sparkles all over my face despite cleansing – which you can use to spice up any base shade. It’s really pretty if you like a shimmer lid – enough to make its mark but not so much it overpowers the base. It’s when you see the swatches that this collection makes sense – it IS dramatic, it IS over the top and it IS impactful and that’s exactly what it’s supposed to be. It’s for the creators not the safe zoners (like me!) and really quite glorious for it. I won’t wear it but I’d greatly admire those who do.

Huda Beauty Matte & Metal Melted Shadows

See what I mean? It’s Mardi Gras, Ru Paul and Care Bears all rolled into one :-). The first shade (yellow) is Limelight, followed by Minted followed by Wednesday. Harrods has them on sale for £11 HERE whereas everywhere else they’re £22. Non affiliate HERE.  

Anyway, happy new year – see you the other side 🙂 xx

 

*all products are sent to me as samples from brands and agencies unless otherwise stated. Affiliate links may be used. Posts are not affiliate driven.

re:p.’s Natural & Herbal Skin Care Review

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The YS Beauty Lab

I tend to keep my skin care routine as simple as possible. This is really important for those with sensitive skin, and even more so for those like me who suffer from skin conditions like atopic dermatitis (eczema). Each individual with sensitive skin may or may not react to different ingredients, which makes finding products that are friendly yet effective exceptionally difficult. In winter, skin sensitivity heightens as dryness in the air makes the skin feel itchy, tight and in some cases even painful, so regular moisturizing is fundamental. On my everlasting quest to find products that are sensitive and dry skin-approved, I stumbled onto re:p. and tried it out, hoping it would salvage my crying winter skin.

re:p. (Real Elemental Practice) is a cruelty-free and organic skin care line by NEOGEN, with a focus on all-natural products that are also environmentally responsible and sustainable. Even their packaging is made of recycled materials and printed with soy ink. What sets re:p. apart from many organic skin care brands are its effective and smart product formulations. The brand also values high-quality natural ingredients that enable their products to condense skin care routines without compromise.

 

Nutrinature Ultra All In One Multitem

What is it? A toner, essence and emulsion in one, infused with antioxidant-rich lotus seed, avocado and olive extracts to nourish, improve elasticity

Does it work?

The Multitem carries a rosy scent and a water-gel texture that melts into a water-like consistency that is quickly absorbed by skin. As my skin is currently extremely dry and sensitive, applying this on a freshly cleansed face triggered a stinging sensation. But about 30 seconds after applying, my face felt calmed and moisturized. Once dried, the finishing is velvety and holds moisture even better than some of the face creams I’ve been using.

 

Nutrinature Ultra All-Night Moisture & Relief Mask

What is it? Soothing and deeply moisturizing overnight mask formulated with lemon balm, apple mint, tea tree, basil, olive oil and niacinamide to promote healing and to fortify the skin barrier.

Does it work?

This feels like an even more nourishing version of the Multitem, as it has a thicker and richer texture but doesn’t leave heaviness on skin. It takes about the same amount of time as the Multitem to dry to a velvety finish. I applied a coin-sized amount after cleansing and toning before hopping to bed. To my surprise, my skin felt pretty soft when I woke up, without the tautness and flakiness I had suffered every morning in the past few weeks.

 

Bio Fresh Mask With Real Calming Herbs

What is it? A calming mineral clay mask made of kaolin that gently rids the skin of debris as well as crushed herbs such as chamomile and calendula for added soothing effects.

Does it work?

This clay mask has a rich herbal scent that reminds me of the Chinese medicinal wine (dit da jow) that my mom used to give me to treat bruises and swellings. Like usual clay masks, the texture slowly thickened as I applied it on my face, prompting a speedy application to ensure an even amount was on before it dried.

After about 10 minutes, some of the formula seemed to have dried a little bit, but it was still relatively easy to wash off with water. When I was washing it off, I noticed that it got rid of some more dead skin, even though I had already exfoliated beforehand.

After patting my face dry with a towel, I realized the majority of the stubborn dry patches that were bothering me for days were gone, and my face hadn’t felt this refreshed for a while. If it was summer, I’d let my skin breathe for a bit longer before finishing off my skin care routine. But as my skin is ridiculously dry, taut and sensitive at the moment, I quickly put on my face oil and night cream.

 

Bio Fresh Mask With Real Nutrition Herbs

What is it? A nourishing peeling clay mask made of kaolin and enriched with hand-crushed rosemary and peppermint to strengthen, moisturize and gently exfoliate impurities and dead skin cells.

Does it work?

As its ingredients list suggests, this clay mask smells exactly like a blend of rosemary and peppermint, with a thick, creamy texture that is surprisingly easy to spread on skin. Even though the mask was kept at room temperature, the herbs in the mask actually gave off a cooling effect. Even after 10 minutes of use, my skin felt rather calm and soft.

 

The Verdict

Halfway through trialing, my skin already felt a lot better. I used the Multitem combined with my face oil two times a day, and the stinging after application was hugely reduced as my skin became less dry. The Bio Fresh Mask With Real Calming Herbs was surprisingly drier than the Real Nutrition Herbs version, but I felt it actually visibly removed more dead skin from my face than general face scrubs. I was rather skeptical of the smell at first, since I’m not a fan of peppermint or rosemary, but the mask’s herbal scent turned out to be rather therapeutic. The All-Night Moisture & Relief Mask delighted me with an unexpected level of nourishment, surpassing night creams and sheet masks that can’t penetrate super dry and sensitive skin.

Overall, I’m pretty surprised and happy with the effects these re:p. products have on my Sahara-level dry skin. I’ve actually felt and seen real improvements in skin texture after one week of continuous use of the Multitem and overnight mask, and single use of each clay mask. I feel that these will definitely suit the needs of all skin types for winter, as the products leave a refreshing or velvety finish that isn’t heavy. Those who are sensitive to scents may find the Multitem and overnight mask a little off-putting, but I loved both!

Get Better Skin & Sleep With This Magical Mineral

We know better than anyone the benefits of botanicals like fruits and plants. But, we also know that you can find good-for-you ingredients from other sources. One often overlooked source of skin support also comes from the earth — quite literally. Minerals can offer a variety of positive effects for both your skin and your overall health. One of our favorites is something you’ve probably heard about quite a bit recently: magnesium.

You might be familiar with it from your high school chemistry days of memorizing the periodic table, but we’re betting you might need a quick refresher. “Magnesium is a mineral that plays a part in over 300 enzymatic reactions that take place in the human body, and is essential for overall body health, particularly bone health and muscle strength,” says Hadley King, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in New York City.

“For the skin, magnesium plays a part in maintaining the levels of fatty acids on the surface of the skin, which help keep the skin moisturized, and in maintaining collagen levels. Magnesium also regulates cellular repair and regeneration and is therefore helpful for protecting the skin from external damage.”

Unfortunately, our bodies do not produce magnesium on its own, meaning we need to look to our diets to get the recommended daily amounts. Foods like green leafy vegetables, whole grains, beans, and fish are all great sources of magnesium, but unfortunately most people don’t eat enough of these to get the proper amount. In fact, nearly two thirds of the population in the Western world are magnesium deficient. Which is where supplements and topical magnesium come in.

When taken orally, magnesium may also be beneficial for specific skin concerns. “[Magnesium] may be helpful for acne because it can lower cortisol production,” says King. “It could also be helpful for eczema and skin allergies because it plays an important role in the immune system.”

“According to some research, applying magnesium topically is more effective than taking magnesium supplements because some supplements can’t stand up to the acidic nature of the stomach and they can lose their potency,” explains nutritionist Tracy Lockwood Beckerman, MS, RD.

If you’d rather opt for magnesium-infused skincare over supplements, consider trying Glow Recipe’s latest launch, Banana Soufflé Moisture Cream. With banana, magnesium, turmeric and chia seed extract, this powerhouse potion will calm stressed skin and strengthen its barrier. Banana is a rich source of magnesium and potassium — the former helps to relax and rebalance irritated and inflamed skin caused by external stressors while maintaining barrier health, and the latter helps skin keep hydrated and moisturized, lessening dryness and irritation. Alongside our new moisturizer’s namesake fruit, it works with turmeric and centella asiatica to hydrate, soothe, and rescue stressed skin. And, for an even bigger magnesium boost, we added chia seed to the formula — according to Lockwood Beckerman, just two tablespoons of chia seed has been shown to provide 30 – 40 percent of your daily magnesium intake.

Speaking of stress, magnesium also helps to relax the body before bed. From the Nue Co’s Magnesium Easy Spray, to Luna Nectar’s Anti-Stress & Sleep Magnesium Oil, to Moon Juice’s Magnesium Supplement, this multi-use ingredient pops up everywhere in the beauty and wellness category.

And, if you’ve ever dropped some epsom salts in a bath to soothe your aches and pains, then you’ve also been experiencing the benefits of this stress-relieving mineral. A combination of magnesium and sulfate, epsom salts have been used for decades to help reduce muscle tension, making it great for anyone dealing with headaches or post-workout muscle pain.

Whether you’re looking to calm your skin, your body, or your mind, magnesium is an essential mineral that can work wonders for the perpetually stressed. Try it for yourself with the new Banana Soufflé Moisture Cream!

The new Revised & Expanded Edition of Wheat Belly released!

The complete updated Wheat Belly program is now available in the Revised & Expanded Edition of Wheat Belly! (For availability, see below.)

In the original Wheat Belly, I recounted how agribusiness and geneticists altered traditional strains of wheat, yielding the high-yield semi-dwarf strain that now dominates supermarket shelves. Consuming modern foods made from this plant yields peculiar, sometimes crippling, health effects, while dramatic benefits develop upon removing it from the diet. If you’ve been following the Wheat Belly conversations, you are no stranger to the huge successes people have shared on this lifestyle.

But lessons have been learned along the way in the marvelous worldwide grain-eliminating experience, lessons shared in subsequent books: Wheat Belly Total Health, Wheat Belly 10-Day Grain Detox, the Wheat Belly cookbooks. The list of strategies we use has grown, strategies that have helped many more people lose the weight they want to lose, address residual health problems, address deficiencies caused by grain consumption but persist after their removal, go further in efforts such as cultivating a healthy microbiome.

So I have rewritten the original Wheat Belly, added the complete prescriptive program we now follow, expanded on discussions about hormonal health and efforts to cultivate a healthy microbiome, tweaked details of the diet, and added new recipes. Anyone who read the original Wheat Belly will recognize a lot that’s familiar, but you will also find plenty that is new. This means that the entire Wheat Belly program is now available in this single Revised & Expanded edition.

Wheat Belly has therefore been completely updated with new material that includes:

  • The FULL Wheat Belly program that we now all follow
  • New and delicious recipes to suit your Wheat Belly lifestyle
  • New discussions on topics such as hormonal health and cultivation of a healthy microbiome

Wheat Belly was the original book that turned the nutritional world topsy-turvy and exposed “healthy whole grains” as the genetically altered Frankenwheat imposed on the public by agricultural geneticists and agribusiness. The tidal wave of astounding health and weight loss successes has created a nationwide movement away from the destructive effects of wheat products. The Revised & Expanded edition now takes you to the next level for health, weight loss, and freedom from numerous diseases and prescription drugs.

  • Removing products made with modern wheat yields astounding and often unexpected benefits in health and weight loss.
  • Autoimmune, gastrointestinal, and mind effects top the list for conditions that improve or reverse with wheat elimination.
  • Weight loss can occur at a surprising rate, typically 15-18 pounds over the first month, when wheat is eliminated.

The new Wheat Belly Revised & Expanded editions is available for pre-order for release on Tuesday Dec 10 from:

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

Books-A-Million

Indiebound

“Wheat Belly hit like a bomb”: Author Dana Carpender reviews the Revised & Expanded Edition of Wheat Belly

Dana Carpender, friend and author of many low-carb cookbooks, provided this review of my new Revised & Expanded Wheat Belly, below.

For more of Dana’s signature wit and conversation, you can join her on her engaging Facebook page “Hold the toast press” or visit her Amazon page that lists all her wonderful low-carb cookbooks.

It’s funny how things happen. Nine years ago I had already been eating a low carbohydrate diet for 16 years. During that time I had occasionally eaten low carb tortillas and low carb bread. These things were hardly a staple of my diet, but I kept ’em around for the occasional late-night grilled cheese sandwich or whatever. But the longer I ate low carb, the less I cared about them and the less often I ate them. Which is why, by January of 2011, it had been at least 8 months since I’d bothered eating either low carb bread or tortillas.

I was working on slow cooker recipes and came up with a recipe for slow cooker mu shu pork. As you may or may not know, mu shu dishes are served wrapped in Chinese pancakes. I figured low carb tortillas would be a fine substitute. So I made a supper of it, having two low carb tortillas wrapped around my meat and vegetables.

I woke up feeling like grim death. Bleary, thick-headed, exhausted, achy all over. It felt like a combination of a bad hangover and going hypothyroid. It was two days before I was back to my usual cheerful, energetic self.

Serendipitously, within a week or two I received a review copy of Dr. William Davis’s Wheat Belly in the mail. 

As I wrote in my original review of the book, I have read a lot of books since I first became interested in nutrition in the summer of ’78. I generally learn a little something new from each one. But Wheat Belly? Wheat Belly hit like a bomb. Every page brought information I simply had not known, had not even suspected.  I knew about celiac disease, but wheat linked to schizophrenia? Seizures? Dementia? Cancer? And a more, in a long and scary list? I had had no idea.

Completely new to me, too, was the information regarding the extreme hybridization of wheat — not the genetic modification that’s the current nutritional boogeyman, just crossing various strains of wheat, to the point that modern wheat is genetically a completely different plant than our grandparents ate — and one that has never been proven safe for human consumption. (Please note: even ancient grains were not good for humanity. The adoption of agriculture resulted in a drop in stature — humans are just recently beginning to reach the height of their hunter-gatherer ancestors — the weakening of bones, and the narrowing of the pelvic outlet, making childbearing far more dangerous and painful than it had hitherto been.)

Add to that the news that wheat is physically addictive — like, really, truly, similar-to-opioids addictive. And you wondered why you have cravings? 

So I’ve been gluten-free ever since. Oh, I may get a tiny bit now and then by mistake, but then, I don’t have celiac. I’m not one of the people who is going to become desperately ill from a single crumb. But eat anything made with gluten grains deliberately? Nope.

It’s not just gluten, as Wheat Belly makes clear. Amylopectin A found in wheat (and other grains, like corn) turns out to be a super-carb, jacking blood sugar up worse than table sugar or corn syrup. Phytates bind up minerals, so those “healthy whole grains” actually lead to deficiencies.

Gluten itself can be broken down into gliadin which, among other charming tendencies, attacks the intestinal wall, causing everything from irritable bowel to leaky gut, and eventually autoimmune disease. Another gut-ripper is wheat germ agglutinin — which agricultural science has deliberately increased in the name of pest control. And you were worried about pesticides on your food! (As a long-time nutrition buff, I remember when wheat germ was the wonder-food du jour. Brrr.)

And exorphins! You know about endorphins, of course — the happy-juice your brain creates in reaction to exercise and such. Exorphins are just what they sound like — drug-like compounds from outside the body. Yes, wheat can get you high and is physically addictive.

In short, everything made of wheat, from an Oreo cookie to 100% whole grain bread, contains as pretty a package of poisons as you’re likely to find posing as food.

Which leads me to one more issue: Since Wheat Belly was first published in 2011, many, many people have chosen to quit eating gluten. Many other people have, for reasons that pass understanding, decided to be honked off about this. “I don’t mind people with celiac asking for gluten-free stuff. But those people who just pretend to be gluten-sensitive are muddying the waters! How can we know if it’s really important that their food is gluten-free? Why do they have to jump on the bandwagon?”

Why do you freaking care?! Do you question why Jewish folks don’t want their eggs scrambled in bacon grease? 

My experience with the tortillas tells me that my body does not like wheat. Isn’t that enough? Can I eschew gluten grains (and grains in general) not because I have celiac but because I’m convinced they are not wholesome food for humans?

I should add that despite the deluge of important and often disturbing information, Wheat Belly is far from a grim read. Bill Davis is a fine writer; he makes the science easy to comprehend, even entertaining — and often funny.

If you’ve wondered what the whole shift away from gluten is about, you need to read Wheat Belly. If someone close to you has gone gluten-free and you cannot understand why you need to read Wheat Belly. If you have been toying with going gluten-free because a lot of your health-conscious friends have gone gluten-free, you need to read Wheat Belly. If you have, indeed, gone gluten-free because you’ve heard various information going around, but would like to bring the reasons into laser-sharp focus, you need to read Wheat Belly. If you’re tired of family and/or friends giving you grief over eschewing wheat and want sound, scientific information to argue with you need to read Wheat Belly. And if like me, you’re just a big health-and-nutrition geek, you have really, really got to read Wheat Belly.

For those of you who read the first edition, there is new info to be had; science marches on. I was pleased to learn of new tests for various wheat sensitivities, all of them less alarming than a bowel biopsy via endoscope. That said, I don’t need a test, I’m convinced.

Because of the new tests, they’ve found a whole lot of people have markers for celiac without the classic symptoms — but increased rates of all kinds of other ugly health consequences. I emailed Dr. Davis partway through reading the new edition of Wheat Belly with the inelegant subject line “Holy s***, Bill.” I had read a few reports recently of alarmingly increased rates of death among younger Americans starting in their 20s. The opioid epidemic is implicated but does not account for all of it. Then I read that celiacs have 29% increased mortality — and that celiac has nearly doubled in the past several decades. (Wait until you read how they discovered that!)

Dr. Davis started a movement 9 years ago, one that has improved the health of thousands. Wheat Belly was important then; it is only more so now. Read it.

The new Wheat Belly Revised & Expanded edition is available from:

Amazon Barnes & Noble

Books-A-Million

Indiebound

Barnes & Noble

An excerpt from the Revised & Expanded Edition of Wheat Belly

 

The original Wheat Belly book rocked the nutritional world with its revolutionary ideas. But, as time has passed, I’ve added new strategies and concepts that have expanded the overall program and taken the health, weight, and youth-preserving benefits even further. I have therefore collected all this new material into a new Revised & Expanded Edition. The new Revised & Expanded Edition of Wheat Belly is now available at all major bookstores.

Here is a brief excerpt from the new foreword:

Wheat Belly began as my modest effort to help people with heart disease stop relying on the revolving door of angioplasty, stents, and bypass surgery. The lifestyle that evolved from this effort did indeed bring a halt to chest pain and heart attacks, converting my procedural practice into one that was purely preventive with virtually no need for heart procedures or hospitals. But it proved to accomplish far more than that. Drugs to reduce blood sugar or blood pressure? Gone. Drugs for acid reflux or diarrhea? Flushed down the toilet. Statin drugs with all-expenses-paid trips to Orlando for the prescriber? Phooey. These efforts evolved into a comprehensive program that addressed a long list of common modern health conditions, from excess weight to type 2 diabetes, from autoimmune conditions to irritable bowel syndrome, along with hundreds of others. The explosive success of this approach, not just in the reduction of heart disease, but in improvements in so many other areas of health, means that the world of nutrition and health will never be the same.

This new and expanded edition of Wheat Belly contains the latest version of this lifestyle, so readers can follow the strategies within as a stand-alone program. I detail the nutritional supplement program that compensates for nutrients deficient in former grain-eaters, as well as nutrients to compensate for deficiencies arising from living modern life. I introduce an in-depth discussion of the hormonal disruptions introduced by consuming “healthy whole grains” that I call Mr. and Mrs. Wheat Belly, showing how readers can take back personal control over hormonal health. I’ve updated the advice and added new recipes to incorporate all the lessons learned along the way as this lifestyle has been adopted by millions of people, making the message even more powerful and effective.

This book includes material never before published in any of the books in the Wheat Belly series. After all, we are trying to unlearn the many lessons drilled into us, now realizing it was all wrong, learning new lessons along the way. And, you know what? It is liberating, exhilarating, and enormously empowering. The problem all along was not you.

 

The new Wheat Belly Revised & Expanded edition is available from:

Amazon Barnes & Noble

Books-A-Million

Indiebound

Barnes & Noble